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what year might this car be


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4 replies to this topic

#1
Dadsmidget

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My dad passed away and left me this car. Is it a Midget or Sprint. The pictures really don't show the rear sheet metal its flat on top and the sides are straight like a boat tail, there is no ripple at the top like in later models.
I need to know what era its from and how much it might be worth as I plan to sell it. He aquired it about 45-50 years ago and along with it were v-8 60s and related performance parts although ive been told the v8 60 wasn't correct for this car, I have blocks, Heads, Mag., intake, strombergs and one full engine with oil pan,heads,mounts, intake

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#2
zerohunger

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Definitely pre-WWII. That looks like a Ford Model T rear axle. There were several popular sets of midget plans used in the early days. You should be able to find them on the Internet & see if your car matches any. V8-60s weren't used until after1938 so I doubt your car had one when first built.

Speedway sells copiesof Jack Fox's excellent Mighty Midgets book; you might compare the car to photos in it.

Chuck Schultz
Winfield, Illinois

#3
larryo

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I have no idea, but I did try to research it a little bit.

It seems this car might be called a sprint car and not a midget, but in the old days they said they were not called sprint cars but "track" cars. That is my 5 minute research project on google for your photo......lol!

I'm guessing this car was originally a 30's car modfified in the 40's. Because I found a link that talked about a car that had four longitudinal springs in which this car has two in the front. Quite unusal, but I have no idea when this car was made. I'm just amazed at the car. It's fascinating. And I like talking on the internet...lol!

Here's a link where I found a little data on 30's - 40's car with four longitudinal leaf springs.

My link

http://www.oldracing.../1946-ted-horn/

I thought old model T cars had traverse springs front and rear. My 1923 T Bucket has traverse springs front and rear. This car only has longitudinal springs in the front?????? Will somebody explain that to me?

This car probably was a purpose built race car and frame . I don't think it came off a ordinary car off the assembly line.

In fact, the schoeder like steering box I don't think came in a passenger car off an assembly line. Just a guess.
I'm probably wrong again.

As for the value, I would guess it's worth anywhere from 1200 to 2500 dollars to the right person. To anybody else I don't think it is worth much. That is just my pie in the sky wild guess. Good luck and thanks for sharing it.

Sincerely,

Larry Otani....I know nothing!

#4
DocF

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What you miss when you are away.

Here are some clues, which may or may not be helpful. The heart shaped grill opening was used by Curly Wetteroth on a lot of Southern California cars in the 30s. The steering gear appears to be a Franklin, which is the basis of the side steer gears used today. They came from the air-cooled Franklin passenger cars. I will study the photos and see what else I can see.

Doc

#5
DocF

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And further information. This car is a very early midget. It is not a sprint car nor a big car. It was professionally built. I would say it was built in Southern California as it looks too slick to be a Midwest or Eastern build. If it is as old as it appears, an inline four such as a Willys or a Van Blerck marine four would be appropriate, although putting a Ford tractor engine in it would be period correct and much easier to run.

Bring it to a professional race car restorer. This may well be worth the many thousands of dollars it will cost to restore.

Doc




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